About Travis CI

Travis CI is a cloud-based continuous integration platform designed to help developers test projects and update production or staging as the tests pass. Key features include authentication, change management, role-based permissions, data synchronization, continuous deployment, custom development and testing management.

Teams using Travis CI can push their codes to the cloud platform and gain greater control over security by integrating the system with Github.com. The solution uses OAuth for authentication, which enables managers to sync user permissions to ensure team members only have access to the necessary repositories. Supervisors can use SAML and LDAP to manage user access. The platform utilizes a 'clean room', which lets businesses, where each build is ru...


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115 Reviews of Travis CI

Average User Ratings

Overall

4.09 / 5 stars

Ease-of-use

4.0

Value for money

4.0

Customer support

3.0

Functionality

4.0

Ratings Snapshot

5 stars

(57)

57

4 stars

(33)

33

3 stars

(22)

22

2 stars

(3)

3

1 stars

(6)

6

Likelihood to Recommend

Not likely

Very likely

Showing 1 - 5 of 115 results

February 2020

User Profile Picture

Ian from Wildfire Systems

Verified Reviewer

Company Size: 2-10 employees

Industry: Internet

Time Used: More than 2 years

Review Source: Capterra


Ease-of-use

4.0

Value for money

5.0

Functionality

5.0

February 2020

CI tool that has a lot of value for the money

I started using Travis initially because I needed a way to have consistent builds of our desktop software (built on Electron). Travis has just the tools I needed to make this happen. Doing local builds of the software was processor intensive, I had to go check the status of the build and I was always changing software on my local machine so sometimes builds would fail because I changed something. Travis has completely containerized build machines so you get the same result every time. We now use it for building all our software. I don't know what we'd do without it.

Pros

* Affordable (it's priced based on users/seats) * Documentation is solid and easy to follow. I've never needed to contact support. There's good online Q&A since Travis has a large user base. * Versatile (whatever software you're building, there's a recipe for it) * Github integration : you get realtime build status RIGHT in Github which is awesome, once you get your system set up, you rarely ever visit Travis again. It just works.

Cons

There's really nothing I didn't like about Travis. Some of the quirks of Electron were the trickiest things to figure out, but that's not Travis's fault. There's a little learning curve when you go from building locally to building remotely with Travis where you need to understand how to set environment variables and retrieve those values in your config/script.

Reasons for Choosing Travis CI

We didn't look at other options. Circle CI would have been the likely comparison but I don't think at the time we made the selection there was much online about Circle CI supporting Electron builds. It may have been possible, but the Electron community was definitely more affiliated with Travis CI. We knew we wanted something hosted, so we didn't look at Jenkins (which, I think, requires you to host and manage it yourself).

October 2019

User Profile Picture

Tamseel from Linknbit

Verified Reviewer

Company Size: 11-50 employees

Industry: Computer Software

Time Used: Less than 12 months

Review Source: Capterra


Ease-of-use

5.0

Value for money

4.0

Customer support

4.0

Functionality

3.0

October 2019

Travis CI is great automation tool is easy to configure and run.

We have used Travis ci for automation of code building, testing and deployment. Travis CI is one of the top continuous integration and continuous delivery tool available in the market. We usually use Travis CI for medium scale projects because it easy to use, few minutes of configure is needed comparative to Jenkins which require skilled professional to configure it. We have used it for test projects as it is free for public projects. Travis Ci is good for small to medium scale projects, which doesn’t require much of the customization or less complex projects. Travis CI is also good for public and open source projects because it provides free tier for public projects. It’s easy to use, you don’t need any professional skill to set it up.

Pros

Great thing about Travis CI is it’s easy to use, easy to configure and start running it, you can easily integrate GitHub account and whenever you push your code its integrated and tested on Travis CI. Travis CI doesn’t need hosting server to run it unlike Jenkins which require hosting server. For public projects you don’t have to pay, its free to use for you test and open source projects. Testing on different environment, devices, OS is optimized and run synchronously. You don’t have to maintain software updates for Travis CI unlike Jenkins. It is fast for testing code on different environment by having different jobs like you can have separate job for unit testing and separate jobs for integration testing.

Cons

Travis CI doesn’t have that much flexibility respect to customization as compare to Jenkins. Integration with third-party tools is not too much which reduces it flexibility. You code is accessible to Travis CI which is not good for most sensitive projects. You must pay for private projects as comparative to Jenkins which is free for private projects.

Reasons for Choosing Travis CI

Travis require less time to configure and it doesn't require hosting server to host it. Online community support is good too.

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

Jenkins require lot of configuration to set it up which require extra time that's why Jenkins is not good for small scale projects. We still use Jenkins for large scale project in that case Jenkins gives lot of flexibility of customization.

November 2021

Richard from Digital Ticketing Systems Limited

Verified Reviewer

Company Size: 11-50 employees

Industry: Internet

Time Used: More than 2 years

Review Source: Capterra


Ease-of-use

4.0

Functionality

4.0

November 2021

Travis-ing

Pros

It works. Which is always a good thing. Other tools exist, but Travis always seemed the simplest to implement with GitHub.

Cons

Seemingly no reason to change things but reworking the domain. Not exactly sure what the whole point was.

Reasons for Switching to Travis CI

Compulsory due to domain name change.

August 2021

Ibraheem from Fitogram

Company Size: 11-50 employees

Industry: Sports

Time Used: Less than 2 years

Review Source: Capterra


Ease-of-use

5.0

Functionality

4.0

August 2021

why do i need a title?

very happy

Pros

I like that it gives a pride option :D checking previous builds, who issues them and if the failed/passed is very nice. for the most part is is smooth and just does its job.

Cons

finding out why a build failed is sometimes very annoying. scrolling a huge page of logs is not smooth (and maybe some better segmenting options there could be useful) we have a weekly recurring job that fails for linting reasons (but we still need it to run to get sonarQube coverage, idk if this is on us for bad implementation) but then who ever deployed last they get an email saying that the build failed. and we can only opt in or out from the whole thing and not just that type of builds.

June 2021

Matthew from Laminas Project

Company Size: 1,001-5,000 employees

Industry: Internet

Time Used: More than 2 years

Review Source: Capterra


Ease-of-use

3.0

Value for money

2.0

Customer support

1.0

Functionality

2.0

June 2021

Static matrices and changes to OSS terms mean I cannot recommend the product

Our initial years with Travis were successful, and we were quite happy with the product. But over time, the lack of flexibility meant struggling to create and deploy our CI definitions. But the part that killed Travis for us was the change to OSS terms late in 2020. We'd already noticed that our queues would become long, particularly if we had many contributors or maintainers working simultaneously. But with the changes in terms, we quickly ran into a scenario where we ran out of hours by mid-month. This left us with an untenable situation; as an OSS project, we have limited funds, and we would quickly run through those if we purchased a plan. As a result, we are within 1-2 weeks of moving off the platform entirely.

Pros

When we first started using the product, it was one of the few that existed, and it provided us exactly the assurances we needed to have predictable, stable software releases. Idempotent runs made it possible to know exactly when and why something failed.

Cons

Since we produce OSS libraries, it's important for us to test against each language version we support. Unfortunately, there is no way in Travis to dynamically create a matrix based on the library/package definition itself. For instance, we produce PHP libraries, and our package management solution, Composer, allows us to specify in the package the versions we support. Unfortunately, when we change those, we also need to remember to change the Travis definitions to reflect those changes. This becomes a source of error very quickly - Travis may report all is green, but it turns out we haven't added the new PHP version to the matrix, so it's a false sense of assurance. On top of that, it's impossible to succinctly make discrete jobs that do different things. For instance, I don't need to run coding standards checks, static analysis, and documentation linting for every single job in the matrix; I really only need to run these once. But to do that, Travis forces me to define env variables for jobs, and then use conditionals to determine what to run. This makes the CI definitions very convoluted, and, if you have a lot of repositories that need to do the same, hard to distribute when you have changes to make. Other CI systems address this.