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Showing 1 - 20 of 831 products
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Showing 1 - 20 of 831 products

Mozart Data

Mozart Data is the quickest and easiest way to set up a modern data stack. We provide a single platform to gather all your data in a data warehouse and prepare it for analysis. Instead of spending months and thousands of dollars...Read more

No reviews yet

10 recommendations

Domo

Domo is a cloud-based business intelligence suite and collaboration platform that provides real-time visualizations of company and project-specific data across multiple business units. ...Read more

9 recommendations

Dundas BI

Dundas BI, from Dundas Data Visualization, is a browser-based business intelligence and data visualization platform that includes integrated dashboards, reporting tools, and data analytics. It provides end users the ability to cre...Read more

8 recommendations

Conversionomics

Conversionomics is an efficient data aggregation tool that offers a simple user interface that makes it easy to quickly build data API sources. From those sources, users can create interactive dashboards and reports using Conversi...Read more

4.50 (2 reviews)

8 recommendations

Style Intelligence

InetSoft Style Intelligence is a business intelligence software platform that allows users to create dashboards, visual analyses and reports via a data mashup engine—a tool that integrates data in real time from multiple sources. ...Read more

4.55 (42 reviews)

6 recommendations

Grow

Grow is a cloud-based business analytics and reporting solution suitable for small to midsize organizations. The solution allows users to create customizable dashboards for monitoring business workflows and key activities. Gr...Read more

4 recommendations

Infor Birst

Birst, an Infor Company, is a web-based networked BI and analytics solution that connects insights from various teams and helps in making informed decisions. The tool enables decentralized users to augment the enterprise data mode...Read more

4.08 (49 reviews)

4 recommendations

BullseyeEngagement Business Intelligence Dashboards

BullseyeEngagement's Business Intelligence Dashboards synthesize data from various sources and make complex information easily understandable. These highly customizable dashboards were built to give busy business leaders real-time...Read more

No reviews yet

3 recommendations

Toucan Toco

Toucan Toco is a fully cloud-based, end-to-end analytics platform built with one goal in mind: destroy the friction that exists between people and data. The Toucan team has worked from day one to make every experience on the pla...Read more

5.00 (7 reviews)

2 recommendations

Quaeris

Search your data, Collaborate and Act. Any data, any question, on any device, anytime, anywhere - that is the promise of Augmented BI from Quaeris. AI in Quaeris lets every user build their own personalized pinboards in seconds...Read more

No reviews yet

2 recommendations

Software pricing tips

Read our Business Intelligence Buyers Guide

Subscription models

  • Per employee/per month: This model allows you to pay a monthly fee for each of your employees.
  • Per user/per month: Users pay a monthly fee for users—normally administrative users—rather than all employees.

Perpetual license

  • This involves paying an upfront sum for the license to own the software and use it indefinitely.
  • This is the more traditional model and is most common with on-premise applications and with larger businesses.

Rated best value for money

Sigma Computing

Sigma is the business intelligence and analytics solution that allows everyone in your organization, not just analysts, to ask questions and find answers using data. Instant, guided access to the cloud data warehouse enables teams...Read more

4.23 (77 reviews)

1 recommendations

Logi Analytics

Logi Analytics is a business intelligence (BI) platform that provides self-service analytics tools for businesses. It can be embedded directly into the applications that employees use every day. Key features include a dashboard, d...Read more

4.20 (40 reviews)

1 recommendations

PlaidCloud

PlaidCloud is a comprehensive business analytics platform that combines data analysis tools, flexible workflows, and business processes to deliver a solution designed to help analyst teams collaboratively develop business models a...Read more

No reviews yet

1 recommendations

Unsupervised

The businesses that win won’t just be data-driven. They’ll be data profitable. Unsupervised is powering business leaders to achieve data profitability with the first Data Capitalization Management (DCM) platform, providing automat...Read more

No reviews yet

1 recommendations

Precision BI

PrecisionBI is a healthcare analytics and visualization platform that combines clinical, financial, and business data all in one place; turning disparate data into insights for impactful decisions. With over 25 years of expe...Read more

No reviews yet

1 recommendations

Jira

Jira Software is a business process management tool used by agile teams to plan, track and release software. Jira Software supports Scrum, Kanban, a hybrid model or another unique workflow. Jira enables users to create projec...Read more

Canva

Canva is a cloud-based graphic design tool used to create on-brand marketing content, sales presentations, training videos and more by companies of all sizes. This solution includes features such as drag-and-drop design and photo ...Read more

Google Analytics

Google Analytics is a cloud-based solution designed to help small to midsize businesses track and evaluate website traffic and improve the performance of marketing, content and product sales. Features include remote data access, c...Read more

Dynamics 365

Microsoft Dynamics 365 is a cloud-based CRM ecosystem for small, medium and enterprise organizations, with a focus on Sales, Field Service, Customer Service complete with strong integrations with Microsoft’s other Office 365 offer...Read more

monday.com

monday.com, an award-winning collaboration and project management platform, helps teams plan together efficiently and execute complex projects to deliver results on time. monday.com team management and task management tool allows ...Read more

Popular Business Intelligence Comparisons

pricing guide

2021 Business Intelligence Pricing Guide

Learn about the key aspects of accurate software pricing before you make your purchase decision.

  • Pricing models & ranges

  • Unexpected costs

  • Pricing of popular systems

Download now

Buyers Guide

Last Updated: September 07, 2021

Business intelligence (BI) software has gained considerable traction since its introduction as "decision support systems" in the 1960s. Today, there are over 100 BI software companies selling business intelligence tools.

We put together this buyer's guide to help buyers understand the BI tools market. In this guide, we'll review:

What is business intelligence software?
Comparing business intelligence tools
Common Features of Business Intelligence Software
Data management tools
Data discovery applications
Reporting tools
What type of buyer are you?
Market trends to understand

What is business intelligence software?

Business intelligence software is data visualization and data analytics software that helps organizations make more well-informed decisions. Business intelligence tools connect to the business's data warehouse, ERP systems, marketing data, social media channels, Excel data imports, or even macroeconomic information.

The business intelligence market is growing rapidly because of the proliferation of data to analyze. Over the past few decades, companies that have deployed Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and other applications are now sitting on a mountain of data that can be analyzed. In addition, the growth of the Web has increased the demand for data analysis tools that can analyze large data sets.

One of the biggest trends in the BI market is the shift in software architecture and design to more user-friendly self-service applications. These applications are now being used by business users—not just IT staff—to pull ad-hoc reports, create interactive dashboards, and even allow end users to perform advanced analytics functions on the BI platform.

Medical practices and doctors looking for solutions that can function with their existing medical software might be interested in healthcare BI software

Comparing business intelligence tools

There are many popular BI solutions on the market, and it can be hard to know what distinguishes one product from another and which is right for you. To help you better understand how the top BI systems stack up against one another, we created a series of side-by-side product comparison pages that break down the details of what each solution offers in terms of pricing, applications, ease of use, support and more:

Top Qlik Sense Comparisons Top Qlikview Comparisons Top Tableau Comparisons
Qlik Sense vs. Qlikview
Qlik Sense vs. Tableau
Qlik Sense vs. Qlikview
Qlikview vs. Spotfire
Qlik Sense vs. Tableau
Spotfire vs. Tableau
Top Spotfire Comparisons    
Qlikview vs. Spotfire
Spotfire vs. Tableau

Common Features of Business Intelligence Software

BI software can be divided into three broad application categories: data management tools, data discovery applications and reporting tools (including interactive dashboards and data visualization software). In the next section, we'll explain how these analytics platforms can help your organization's decision-making process become more data-driven.

The BI tool you'll need depends on how your data is currently managed and how you would like to analyze it. For example, if it is currently scattered across disparate transactional databases, you might need to build a data warehouse to centralize it and invest in data management tools that offer Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) functionality to move and re-structure it.

Once data is given a common structure and format, you can invest in data discovery solutions such as Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), data mining and semantic or text mining applications, with the capability to create custom, ad hoc reports. And because information is stored within the warehouse, users can quickly pull reports without impacting the performance of the organization’s software applications, such as CRM, ERP and supply chain management solutions.

We’ve illustrated this concept in the image below:

Business Intelligence (BI) Software Architecture


But this isn’t the only way to implement business intelligence software within your organization. If you’re only analyzing data from a single source, ETL and data warehouses are unnecessary. Alternatively, you might require multiple warehouses, and thus, require different tools to connect data between both these servers and other analytics tools that need access to this data.

Regardless of your unique business needs, any BI tool you buy should have some key features:

  • Data quality management
  • Extract, transform and load (ETL)
  • Data mining
  • Online analytical processing (OLAP)
  • Predictive analytics
  • Semantic and text analytics
  • Data visualizations
  • Interactive dashboards
  • Report writers
  • Scorecarding
  • Ad hoc reporting

Data management tools

Better decision-making starts with better data. Data management tools help clean up "dirty data," organize information by providing format and structure and prepare data sources for analyses.

Functionality Description
Data quality management Helps organizations maintain clean, standardized and error-free data. Standardization is especially important for business intelligence tools that integrate data from diverse sources. Data quality management ensures that later analyses are correct and can lead to improvements within the business.
Extract, transform and load (ETL) Collects data from outside sources, transforms it and then loads it into the target system (a database or a data warehouse). Because primary data is often organized using different schemas or formats, analysts can use ETL tools to normalize it for use in analytics.

Data discovery applications

The ability to sift through data and come to meaningful conclusions is one of the most powerful benefits of adopting business intelligence tools. Data discovery applications help users make sense of their data, whether it be through quick, multivariate analysis during OLAP or via advanced algorithms and statistical computations during data mining.

Functionality Description
Data mining Sorts through large amounts of data to identify new or unknown patterns. It is often the first step that other processes rely on, such as predictive analytics. Databases are often too large or convoluted to find patterns with the naked eye or through simple queries. Data mining helps point users in the right direction for further analysis by providing an automated method of discovering previously neglected trends.
Online analytical processing (OLAP) Enables users to quickly analyze multidimensional data from different perspectives. It is typically made up of three analytical operations: data consolidation, data sorting and classification ("drill-down"), and data analytics from a particular perspective ("slice-and-dice"). For example, a user could analyze sales numbers for various products by store and by month. OLAP allows users to produce this analysis.
Predictive analytics Analyzes current and historical data to make predictions about future risks and opportunities. An example of this is credit scoring, which relies on an individual's current financial standing to make predictions about their future credit behavior.
Semantic and text analytics Extracts and interprets large volumes of text to identify patterns, relationships and sentiment. For example, the popularity of social media has made text analytics valuable to companies with a large social footprint. Understanding semantic trends is a powerful tool for organizations evaluating purchase intent or customer satisfaction among users of these channels.

Reporting tools

In the words of John W. Tuckey, “the greatest value of a picture is when it forces us to notice what we never expected to see.” Reporting applications are an important way to present data and easily convey the results of analysis.

Business intelligence users are increasingly business users—not IT staff—who need quick, easy-to-understand displays of information. In response, software vendors have been working to mask the complexity of these applications and increasingly focus on the user experience.

Functionality Description
Visualizations Helps users create advanced interactive dashboard representations of data via simple user interfaces. The ability to visualize information in a graphical format (as opposed to words or numbers) can help users understand data in a more insightful way. In addition, new interactive tools can help teams use analytics and manipulate reports in real-time.
Dashboards Dashboards typically highlight key performance indicators (KPIs), which help managers focus on the metrics that are most important to them. Dashboards are often browser-based, making them easily accessible by anyone with permissions.
Report writers Allows users to design and generate custom reports. Many CRM and ERP systems include built-in BI reporting tools, but users can also purchase standalone applications, such as Crystal Reports, to create ad hoc reports based on complex queries. This is especially helpful for organizations that constantly use analytics and need to generate new reports quickly.
Scorecarding Scorecards attach a numerical weight to performance and map progress toward goals. Think of it as dashboards taken one step further. In organizations with a strategic performance-management methodology (e.g., balanced scorecard, Six Sigma etc.), scorecards are an effective way to keep tabs on key metrics. For example, a scorecard might establish a grade of “A+" to 40 percent year-over-year growth if the goal was set at 14 percent.

What type of buyer are you?

Before evaluating software, you must determine what type of buyer you are.

Business users and departmental buyers. These buyers favor small data-discovery vendors and BI tools over the big, traditional BI systems. Ease-of-use and fast deployment are more important than in-depth functionality and integration. They are usually business users rather than IT staff.

IT buyers. Traditional buyers are more focused on functionality and integration within their information infrastructure stacks or other ERP applications. Integration across different entities and departments is usually more important than ease of use.

Market trends to understand

As you begin your software comparison and evaluation, there are a couple trends to consider:

In-memory processing: OLAP systems of the past would pre-calculate every possible combination of data. These calculations would be stored in the “cube,” and users could retrieve them when they needed a certain analysis. Creating these cubes was very time-consuming—sometimes taking as long as a year—and required expertise. Today, computer processors and memory are faster, cheaper and more powerful overall. This same process can happen in-memory, rather than using a disk-based approach with cubes. Analytics software built on an in-memory architecture can retrieve data and perform calculations in real-time or on-the-fly.

Big Data: The Internet is rapidly creating vast amounts of data. This phenomenon is known as "big data" among IT and business leaders. Business analytics software companies are beefing up their data warehousing and analytics capabilities to keep up with demand.

However, according to Gartner, through 2015, 85% of Fortune 500 organizations will be unable to exploit big data for competitive advantage. The right BI tools can help harness the power of so much data.

Companies dealing with large amounts of data may also want to consider investing in dedicated IT security suites to support their computer security needs.

Business users to outnumber IT staff: This is a major trend playing out in the market. More business users—rather than traditional IT staff—are evaluating and purchasing software. So usability is becoming more important than functionality during software evaluations. As a result, small data discovery vendors that develop really good interactive visualization tools are gaining market share. Meanwhile, traditional BI vendors are parroting new market entrants by promoting ease of use.

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS): A growing number of organizations are considering SaaS or “cloud” BI software instead of traditional, on-premise software that you install on-location. Cost is a major driver of this trend. The poorly performing economy is motivating companies to look at lower-cost BI software from SaaS and open source vendors. Of course, perceived ease of use, faster implementations and reduced IT needs are also driving this trend. On-premise BI vendors are responding by committing development resources to cloud technology.

Mobile BI applications:
 
Proliferation of the iPhone, iPad and other mobile devices is pushing vendors (e.g., Microsoft and Oracle) to develop on-the-go business intelligence applications. Analysts think mobile BI could expand the population of BI users to a larger, mainstream audience.